Like Millennials, More Older Americans Steering Away From Driving

Last Updated by David Schaper on

Americans of all ages are tossing away the keys and giving up their driver's licenses, a new study shows. Cars are being replaced by bikes, public transit and ride-hailing services.

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Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

Last Updated by Nell Greenfieldboyce on

The 8-inch insect nearly went extinct when hungry rats overran its island. But Melbourne scientists found a few in 2001 and started a thriving colony. Now the San Diego Zoo is hatching them, too.

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Once Pakistan's Pride, Its Embattled National Carrier Fights To Survive

Last Updated by Philip Reeves on

Decades ago, Pakistan International Airlines was a trendy airline whose flight attendants wore Pierre Cardin uniforms. These days the national carrier is $3 billion in debt and fighting privatization.

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Should India's Internet Be Free Of Charge, Or Free Of Control?

Last Updated by Julie McCarthy on

Facebook's free Internet service was banned in India on the basis of net neutrality this week. Internet providers, regulators say, should not be allowed "to shape the users' Internet experience."

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The Precarious Existence Of Iran's Sunni Muslims

Last Updated by Steve Inskeep on

Shiite-majority Iran is home to millions of Sunnis, including the Sunni imam who opened his door to NPR's Steve Inskeep in Tehran. "We live together nicely," he insists. But he must speak with care.

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This Mosquito Likes Us Too Much For Our Own Good

Last Updated by Jason Beaubien on

Meet Aedes aegypti. It's an ideal spreader of disease — from its attraction to trash to its habit of sipping blood from lots of folks in one feeding spree.

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In South Carolina, Young Black Voters Could Put Holes In Clinton's 'Firewall'

Last Updated by Sam Sanders on

Most polls show Hillary Clinton beating Bernie Sanders soundly in the state's upcoming primary, due to overwhelming black support. But many young black voters are turning lukewarm on Clinton.

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Growing Old With Einstein: The Long Wait For Detection Of Gravitational Waves

Last Updated by Adam Frank on

After many years, scientists are expected to say they have finally seen gravitational waves — giving Einstein a boost and opening up a whole new view of the universe, says astrophysicist Adam Frank.

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FBI Arrests Cliven Bundy As Pressure Mounts On 4 Remaining Wildlife Refuge Occupiers

Last Updated by Mark Katkov on

The FBI said it arrested Bundy in Portland late Wednesday night. Charges will be made public Thursday.

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Muslim Community Remembers Chapel Hill Victims

Last Updated by Reema Khrais on

A year after a gunman killed 3 young Muslim-Americans in North Carolina, many in the local Muslim community has responded by being more vocal and visible around issues of faith.

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Harry Potter Fans Rejoice! New Book From The Wizarding World Coming This Summer

Posted by Laura Wagner on

The book, called Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts I & II picks up the story of Harry and co. where the series epilogue left off. It will comprise the script of a play of the same name.

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New Hampshire Turnout Breaks Records, But Not On Democratic Side

Last Updated by Domenico Montanaro on

The total ballots cast and turnout among Republicans was the highest ever. But, for Democrats, it was big, but not perhaps as "huge" as Bernie Sanders made it out to be.

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Fed Chair Janet Yellen Warns Of Growing Risks To U.S. Economy

Last Updated by John Ydstie on

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen made clear in congressional testimony Wednesday she sees an economy that faces increased risk. Her assessment was sufficiently downbeat to practically remove the possibility of another interest rate hike at the Fed's next monetary policy meeting in March.

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On The Streets Of Tehran, Searching For Signs Of Economic Improvement

Last Updated on

Steve Inskeep takes the subway around Tehran — meeting ordinary Iranians along the way. Many are skeptical about whether recent sanctions relief will improve their standards of living any time soon.

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Virus Profilers Race To Figure Out What Makes Zika Tick

Posted by Nell Greenfieldboyce on

Though Zika was discovered in 1947, few scientists since had studied the virus. Now, while some check its genes, others turn to placental cells for clues to any link between Zika and birth defects.

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Should India's Internet Be Free Of Charge, Or Free Of Control?

Facebook's free Internet service was banned in India on the basis of net neutrality this week. Internet providers, regulators say, should not be allowed "to shape the...

Once Pakistan's Pride, Its Embattled National Carrier Fights To Survive

Decades ago, Pakistan International Airlines was a trendy airline whose flight attendants wore Pierre Cardin uniforms. These days the national carrier is $3 billion...

Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

The 8-inch insect nearly went extinct when hungry rats overran its island. But Melbourne scientists found a few in 2001 and started a thriving colony. Now the San...

The Precarious Existence Of Iran's Sunni Muslims

Shiite-majority Iran is home to millions of Sunnis, including the Sunni imam who opened his door to NPR's Steve Inskeep in Tehran. "We live together nicely," he...

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