'End Of The Tour': An Unauthorized 'Anti-Biopic' Of David Foster Wallace

Updated by Joel Rose at

Instead of telling the author's life story, the film (which the Wallace estate does not approve of) focuses on five days in 1996 during the publicity tour for Infinite Jest.

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Marine Version Of F-35 Reportedly Deemed 'Combat Ready'

Updated by Scott Neuman at

With a total program cost estimated at $400 billion and a per-plane price tag of $135 million, the Joint Strike Fighter program is considered the most expensive in U.S. history.

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#NPRReads: Considering The Language Of Wine And What's In A Toddler's Mouth

Updated by Eyder Peralta at

Also, we explore a piece that argues that you should want robots to take your job. No. Seriously.

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Research: Let Your Fingers Stroll Down Yellow Pages' Listings

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Researchers examined the quality of plumbers in the Chicago area who choose names that are designed to show up first alphabetically in the Yellow Pages. The first company isn't necessarily the best.

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Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

A study finds that children who demonstrate more "pro-social" skills — those who share more and who are better listeners — are more likely to have jobs and stay out of trouble as young adults.

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Not All Online Restaurant Reviews Are Created Equal

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Reviews on TripAdvisor or Yelp by tourists tend to be significantly more lenient than reviews by locals. Reviews written a long time after the reviewer visits the restaurant are similarly lenient.

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The Unintended Consequences Of A Program Designed To Help Homeowners

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

A Maryland program designed to help struggling homeowners ended up contributing to foreclosures in some cases. Researchers say it's an example of unintended consequences of some government policies.

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Disagreeable Teens Fail To Understand Their Blind Spots, Research Reveals

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Disagreeable teens tend to grow up into disagreeable adults. A 10-year study finds that disagreeable teens often have no awareness that their behavior is harming their relationships.

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Examining Race-Based Admissions Bans On Medical Schools

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Researchers explored the effects of black and Latino graduation rates from medical school, following a ban on race conscious admissions policies in several states.

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New Research Finds Lonely People Have Superior Social Skills

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Intuitively, many of us might think lonely people are lonely because they have poor social skills. New research turns this thinking on its head and offers a potential cure for loneliness.

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Having An Older Sister Can Change Siblings' Lives, Study Finds

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

According to the research: men who have older sisters, on average, are less competitive than men who don't. And women who have older sisters, are more competitive than women who do not.

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Retailers Use Time To Their Advantage; More Impulse Products Sold

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Retailers have learned that the more time consumers spend in a store, the more likely they'll make impulse purchases. Stores are adapting the "shopping experience" accordingly.

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Smoking Pot Interferes With Math Skills, Study Finds

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

Researchers studying the effects of marijuana faced an obstacle: they couldn't create an exact control group. But a change in drug laws in the Netherlands offered a perfect laboratory.

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Many NFL Players Make Abysmal Financial Decisions, Research Shows

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

New research suggests many NFL players struggle with money over their lifetimes, and a staggering number of them go bankrupt. Making a lot of money as a player does not seem to offer much protection.

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Attempt To Get More People On Board With Organ Donation Backfires

Updated by Shankar Vedantam at

To increase the number of organ donors in the U.S., psychologists have advocated for changes to how we ask people to donate. In California, officials tried something new — but it may have backfired.

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Arson Attack That Killed Toddler In West Bank Is Called Terrorism

Arson Attack That Killed Toddler In West Bank Is Called Terrorism

An 18-month old died in the fire. The perpetrators scrawled slogans in Hebrew on an outside wall of the house. Palestinian leaders blamed the Israeli government.

New Ebola Vaccine Has '100 Percent' Effectiveness In Early Results

New Ebola Vaccine Has '100 Percent' Effectiveness In Early Results

The trial of the VSV-EBOV vaccine was called Ebola ça Suffit — French for "Ebola that's enough." Researchers say it's both effective and quick, with no new Ebola...

Summer Olympics 2008 Host Beijing Awarded 2022 Winter Games

Summer Olympics 2008 Host Beijing Awarded 2022 Winter Games

The International Olympic Committee has selected Beijing as the host city for the 2022 Winter Olympics. It's the first city ever to host both summer and winter games.

20% off Poldark Collection @ ShopPBS.org! Valid 7/28-8/3

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