Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

Updated by Kristofor Husted at

Conventional farmers use millions of pounds of pesticides each year to protect crops from weeds and insects. When those chemicals drift to neighboring property, they can ruin crops on organic farms.

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Acquitted Of Extreme Corruption, Former Officers Now Sue For Defamation

Updated at

Five former members of a Philadelphia Police Department narcotics squad are suing the city's top officials for defamation. Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Jeremy Roebuck explains.

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Jon Stewart's Private White House Meetings

Updated at

Comedian Jon Stewart was called to the White House on at least two occasions for private meetings with President Obama, according to Politico. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with reporter Darren Samuelsohn.

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What's Behind The Heartbreak For Cecil The Lion

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The killing of the lion Cecil in Zimbabwe led to worldwide outrage. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with author Hal Herzog about why the deaths of certain animals can elicit such emotional reactions.

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As First Presidential Debate Looms, A Look At The Landscape Of The Race

Updated by Ron Elving at

The first debate of the 2016 presidential campaign season is Thursday, Aug. 6. With so many Republican candidates trying to get on stage, what should voters be looking for?

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'Haqqathon' Takes Anti-ISIS Fight To Cyberspace

Updated by Dina Temple-Raston at

In Arabic, haqq is the word for truth. Muslim software designers gathered recently for a "haqqathon" to develop social media products that can compete with violent extremists online.

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Nostalgic Cars: Sour Automotive Fruit Of Cuban Embargo Gets New Life

Updated by Robert Siegel at

In Havana, Cuba, the old cars that crowd the streets used to symbolize a stagnant nation. Now enterprising Cubans have begun renting cars out to tourists who are hungry for the cars of their youth.

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Aviator Beryl Markham Soars Again In 'Paris Wife' Author's New Book

Updated by NPR Staff at

"It is my fate to illuminate the lives of these one-of-a-kind notable women that have been somehow forgotten by history," says Paula McLain. She shines her spotlight on Markham in Circling the Sun.

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For Many Adopted Dogs, The Journey Home Takes A Thousand Miles

Updated by Marisa Peñaloza at

In Puerto Rico, poverty and lax rules have stranded about 300,000 dogs as strays. So rescue groups are sending many of those dogs to the mainland — and trying to change attitudes on the island.

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'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

Updated by NPR Staff at

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.

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An Object Of Desire: Hope And Yearning For The Internet In Cuba

Updated by Robert Siegel at

Without a doubt, the Internet in Cuba is tough. The politics are thorny; getting it is difficult. But there are signs that change is on the horizon.

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Terri Lyne Carrington Makes A Musical 'Mosaic,' With A Focus On Women

Updated by NPR Staff at

The drummer, composer and bandleader's latest album, The Mosaic Project: Love and Soul, is part of her ongoing effort to showcase women in jazz.

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'Who Am I Without My Sport?' Greg Louganis On Life After Olympics

Updated by NPR Staff at

The documentary Back On Board traces the highs and lows of the star diver's career, the turmoil he faced as a gay, HIV-positive athlete — and the identity crisis that he experienced after retirement.

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Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Updated by Dan Charles at

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.

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To Ease An Economic Meltdown, Zimbabwe Considers Returning Farmland

Updated by NPR Staff at

In 2000, the country launched a campaign that seized thousands of white-owned farms. The move helped send Zimbabwe into an economic tailspin. But now, some of those farmers may get that land back.

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As First Presidential Debate Looms, A Look At The Landscape Of The Race

As First Presidential Debate Looms, A Look At The Landscape Of The Race

The first debate of the 2016 presidential campaign season is Thursday, Aug. 6. With so many Republican candidates trying to get on stage, what should voters be...

Review Of Leaked Test Results Shows Doping Is Widespread In Track And Field

Review Of Leaked Test Results Shows Doping Is Widespread In Track And Field

The reports are based on the results of more than 12,000 blood tests from 5,000 athletes. Experts said analysis shows the sport's governing body has failed to take...

A Hitchhiking Robot's Journey West Ends Early ... In Philadelphia

A Hitchhiking Robot's Journey West Ends Early ... In Philadelphia

The hitchBOT, as its creators named it, had already successfully traversed Canada and Germany. This summer, relying on the kindness of strangers, it wanted to travel...

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