American Public Media

Further reading for Keeping Teachers

Last Updated by Emily Hanford on

Resources and extended reading materials for the documentary Keeping Teachers.

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Black men and teachers in rural areas are in especially short supply

Last Updated by Emily Hanford on

Teachers matter more than anything else in a school. But schools are struggling to hold on to the teachers they need.

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Schools in poor, rural districts are the hardest hit by nation's growing teacher shortage

Last Updated by Emily Hanford on

As in many parts of the country, remote McDowell County in West Virginia is having a hard time finding and keeping teachers. Vacancies are often filled by substitutes unqualified for the roles they must assume, and the isolated location deters many new hires.

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Why are there so few black male teachers?

Last Updated by Emily Hanford on

Only 2 percent of teachers in American public schools are black men. Why so few? Here's what the data show.

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What are the consequences of rising college costs?

Last Updated by Kerri Miller and Elizabeth Shockman on

The cost of college tuition is rising, but how is that affecting the way graduates look for jobs, fit into the economy, and are able to innovate? MPR News host Kerri Miller led a roundtable discussion on the cost of college tuition.

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Minnehaha Academy parent opens up about explosion and upper campus move

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

Earlier this week, Minnehaha Academy got final approval to use the former Brown College campus in Mendota Heights as a temporary home for the high school.

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Videos show Colorado high school cheerleaders forced into splits

Last Updated by Press, The Associated on

Cheerleading coaches and school administrators in a Colorado district have been placed on leave, and Denver police are investigating videos showing cheerleaders screaming in pain while being pushed into splits.

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Aspen Ideas Festival: When colorblindness renders me invisible to you

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

Former NPR host Michele Norris moderated a discussion about race, inequality and the future of democracy at this summer's Aspen Ideas Festival. Is opportunity and social mobility still possible in America?

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Minnehaha Academy students relocate to Mendota Heights, while explosion-damaged campus is rebuilt

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

The Mendota Heights City Council unanimously approved allowing high school use of the former home of a Brown College campus in a special meeting Wednesday.

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Do school voucher systems work?

Last Updated by Kerri Miller and Elizabeth Shockman on

President Trump's pick for Education Secretary, Betsy DeVos has championed a new approach to education in the U.S. that employs the use of school vouchers. What do we know about the success rate of the school voucher system?

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Organizer hopes boxing will keep kids busy, and safe

Last Updated by Brandt Williams on

A summer enrichment program in north Minneapolis aims to give young people skills and confidence, while also keeping them out of potential trouble.

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Aspen Ideas Festival: Are the founding fathers overrated?

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

David Rubenstein asks, and tries to answer, the question, "Are the Founding Fathers overrated?" He says they were talented and courageous people, who deserve all the credit they get for putting the country together and creating a durable constitution... but they could not figure out a way to deal with America's biggest original defect: slavery.

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Civil War lessons often depend on where the classroom is

Last Updated by Press, The Associated on

The effect of inconsistent teaching may not be obvious until a related issue is thrust into the spotlight like this month's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the resulting backlash against Confederate symbols.

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A Supreme Court case 35 years ago yields a supply of emboldened DACA students today

Last Updated by Catherine Winter on

Four immigrant families sued the Tyler, Texas school district in 1977 after their children were kicked out and required to pay for a public education. Five years later the court ruled in favor of the families, citing equal protection. It allowed generations of undocumented children to learn next to American-born peers and have a fair chance in life, say experts. And their journeys contributed to a

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Colleges brace for more violence amid rash of hate on campus

Last Updated by Press, The Associated on

At college campuses, far-right extremist groups have found fertile ground to spread their messages and attract new followers.

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Finding The Right Words To Help Rohingya Refugees

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