American Public Media

Aspen Ideas Festival: Has democracy run its course?

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

At an Aspen Ideas Festival event, three panelists tried to answer one question: has democracy run its course?

Read More

Kaler: Even with tuition hike U of M will stay competitive

Last Updated by Erickson, Jo and Tom Weber on

Out-of-state students will see an increase of 12.5 percent, which translates total tuition of $25,000 a year.

Read More

Aspen Ideas Festival: StoryCorps founder David Isay on the importance of listening

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

Four hundred thousand people people have recorded their stories for radio and the Library of Congress via StoryCorps and Isay says it's important to tell the truth about who we are as human beings, in order to reduce fear and increase hope.

Read More

Minneapolis could reduce number of police officers in schools

Last Updated by Matt Sepic on

Minneapolis schools Superintendent Ed Graff is recommending the school board reduce the number of school resource officers from 16 to 14.

Read More

Anonymous alumni commit $40 million to Gustavus Adolphus

Last Updated by MPR News, Staff on

It's the largest-ever donation to Gustavus Adolphus College and one of the largest ever made to a Minnesota college. The St. Peter school said the money will go to scholarships and to renovating its science building.

Read More

What children in food deserts do during the summer

Last Updated by Suzanne Pekow on

There are millions of kids in America who the USDA considers "food insecure" -- they live in households without regular access to nutritious food. For them, school feeding programs are essential.

Read More

When a diploma means more than just 'seat time'

Last Updated by Suzanne Pekow on

A state law says Maine high school students have to prove they have mastered specific skills to get a diploma.

Read More

College is a leap of faith - and funds - for first-generation students

Last Updated by Suzanne Pekow on

At a public charter school in Boston, students spend years preparing to go to college. But paying for it is another story.

Read More

'All they wanted to do was get an education'

Last Updated by Catherine Winter on

Thirty-five years ago, four immigrant families won a landmark Supreme Court case that protects the rights of children in the United States to attend public schools, whether they have papers or not.

Read More

Making room for poor kids at rich schools

Last Updated by Suzanne Pekow on

A new study shows selective colleges could bring in many more talented low-income students. So why don't they?

Read More

More than 500 infrastructure projects are pitched to Trump, who will favor private money and speed

Last Updated by Tom Scheck on

States, unions, presidential advisers and consultants flood the White House with proposals. The president's pledge to cut regulations and his condition for funding — "If you have a job that you can't start within 90 days ... it doesn't help us" — risks leaving critical construction and repair behind.

Read More

Most states neglect ordering police to learn de-escalation tactics to avoid shootings

Last Updated by Curtis Gilbert on

In 34 states, training decisions are left to local agencies. Most, though, conduct no, or very little, de-escalation training. Chiefs cite cost, lack of staff, and a belief that the training isn't needed.

Read More

Three case studies: When police untrained in de-escalation shoot unarmed people

Last Updated by Jennifer Vogel on

A review of 31 cases shows more than half of officers involved had fewer than two hours of training past five years.

Read More

A public school that's just for immigrants

Last Updated by Suzanne Pekow on

English learners are the least likely to graduate from high school when compared to other groups of students. There's a new high school in Bowling Green, Kentucky, that's trying to help new immigrant students beat the odds.

Read More

Sanner retires suddenly; Rassier files suit, claiming mistreatment by Sanner and others

Last Updated by Madeleine Baran on

Sanner, who led Wetterling investigation, has not apologized to Rassier, and has said he stands behind his actions as sheriff for 14 years. He hasn't commented on the lawsuit.

Read More
pbs.pngnpr.pngpbskids.png
listenlive_fulllength.jpg cove_spacer.png
Now Playing on WVIA-FM

        

nprnews5.jpg

Fewer Homeless Veterans On LA's Streets

The city's most recent homeless count showed that the veteran homeless population had declined 18 percent. But some...

Angered By Attack, Mob Slaughters Hundreds Of Crocodiles In Indonesia

Following the funeral of a local resident killed by a crocodile after apparently straying into a local wildlife...

Scared Of Math? Here's One Way To Fight The Fear

Kids and grown-ups can both experience anxiety when it comes to math. One college professor has an assignment to...

healthybites_sidebar2.png reserve3.png artscene_header.png