Minnesota Congressional delegation: What would you do to stop school shootings? | WVIA

Minnesota Congressional delegation: What would you do to stop school shootings?

Last Updated by Tim Nelson on
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A gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14, in Parkland, Florida. The most recent mass school shooting in America again ignited calls for legislative action. This time the pleas have also come from the Florida students who survived the rampage.

MPR News asked Minnesota's Congressional delegation specifically what each of them will do. Rep. Jason Lewis, Rep. Erik Paulsen, and Rep. Tom Emmer did not respond.

"What is the answer to stopping shootings like the one at the school in Florida and what steps will you take, specifically, to keep this from happening again?"













U.S. Rep. Tim Walz




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. House District1




"We should find those things where there's common ground, and the vast majority of people, lawful gun owners and those who care about making this happen, I think you can do universal background checks. That is something we should offer up. It has not been done. It has not been done whether Democrats have been in charge or Republicans have been in charge."













U.S. Rep. Jason Lewis




Republican


U.S. House District2




No response














U.S. Rep. Erik Paulsen




Republican


U.S. House District3




No response














U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. House District4




"Elections have consequences... I think it's going to come down to, do people make this a priority when they go to vote next year, and elect people that want to move forward on common sense gun reforms so that these massive shootings are addressed. And these weapons are out there now. We have to work with law enforcement, work with mental health professionals and work across the aisle with each other to reduce this gun violence epidemic."














U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. House District5




"I would ban assault weapons. I would ban high-capacity magazines. I would require universal background checks. I would require the Centers for Disease Control to track and monitor handgun deaths, and I believe so sincerely in these things, that last year after the Pulse nightclub shooting, I joined my Democratic colleagues to take over the House floor, because we felt that strong about it."














U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer




Republican


U.S. House District6




No response














U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. House District7




"The solutions that are put forward are not solutions that are going to fix anything. They're ideologically based, depending on what point of view you have. And the same old things keep coming up. Background checks, (checks at) gun shows, no fly loopholes... Not one of those shooters would have been caught by any of the things that have been talked about for the last five years."














U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. House District8




"Why is it that we can only have three shells in our gun when we're shooting ducks, but we can have as many high-capacity clips and magazines in our assault rifle when we're shooting children. There are things we can do. We can start by, of course, the background checks, and keeping (those) who are criminally or mentally ill from getting guns. That's a good starting point. But there are other things. We should outlaw these assault rifles."














U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. Senate




"Not every change will help in every situation. But clearly doing something so that domestic abusers can't get guns. So that terrorists can't get guns. So that we have sensible background checks in place. That would make a difference."














U.S. Sen. Tina Smith




Democratic-Farmer-Labor


U.S. Senate




"You can't make sense of these tragedies. I can't make sense of exactly what happened at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. But I refuse to accept that we can't do something about this epidemic of gun violence that we have in our country and still respect people's Second Amendment rights. And I think these two things, a universal background check and a ban on these military-style assault weapons would be two steps that we could take."



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