NPR News

Will Work For No Benefits: The Challenges Of Being In The New Contract Workforce

Last Updated by Yuki Noguchi on

A new NPR/Marist poll shows that more than half of contract workers don't get employee benefits. "We really don't have much of a social safety net, and that's terrifying," freelancer Matt Nelson says.

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Several Injured After Volcanic Eruption At Japanese Ski Resort

Last Updated by Scott Neuman on

Mount Kusatsu-Shirane suddenly erupted Tuesday morning, spewing volcanic rocks and belching a curtain of black smoke. An avalanche that followed injured at least 10 people.

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Powerful Quake Strikes Off Alaska, Triggering Tsunami Warning For Coast

Last Updated by Scott Neuman on

The magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck about 175 southeast of Kodiak, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. U.S. Tsunami Warning System has issued a tsunami warning for coastal regions.

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Officials In California Town Take Down 'Bob's House' Sign

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A legitimate looking road sign reading "Bob's House" with a right pointing arrow was hung up on the side of the road under a sign for the town of Coto de Caza. Bob's sign can be picked up a City Hall.

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Trump Signs Measure To Reopen The Federal Government

Last Updated by Scott Horsley on

While the federal government may be reopening after the weekend shutdown, Congress has just three weeks to reach an agreement on government spending and immigration — or it could all happen again.

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Oscar Nominations Will Be Viewed Through 'MeToo' Lens

Last Updated by Mandalit del Barco on

The 90th Academy Award nominations are announced Tuesday. Issues about sexual misconduct and gender parity might play a role in how members vote, and they may come up during the ceremony in March.

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth Talks About Her Trip To South Korea

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Rachel Martin talks to Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, an Iraq war veteran, who recently returned from a trip to South Korea and the DMZ, about the threat of nuclear war with North Korea.

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Plans Are Announced To Privatize Puerto Rico's Electric Utility

Last Updated by Adrian Florido on

Gov. Ricardo Rossello announced plans Monday to privatize the island's troubled electric utility. In a speech, he said the process of selling off the public utility's assets would begin in days.

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Did Senate Democrats Help Or Hurt Themselves During The Shutdown?

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Monday's Senate vote to end the three-day government shutdown has divided the Democratic Party. David Greene talks to Georgetown University's Mo Elleithe, a former strategist for the Democratic Party.

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Frozen Ball Of Human Waste Falls From Sky

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When scientists examined the 20 pound rock, they determine it probably was not a meteor. Officials believe it is a frozen ball of excrement and are having samples tested.

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What Do Asthma, Heart Disease And Cancer Have In Common? Maybe Childhood Trauma

Last Updated by Cory Turner on

Toxic stress in childhood can lead to a lifetime of health problems and, ultimately, a shorter life. Here's what schools can do to help.

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News Brief: Government Reopens, Deal Goes Through Feb. 8

Last Updated by Rachel Martin, David Greene on

The government shutdown is over but there is still a lot to be worked out in the coming weeks. The deal gives lawmakers until Feb. 8 to reach an agreement on government spending and immigration.

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Even In The Days Of Tinder, Old-School Matchmakers Are Needed

Last Updated by David Greene on

Los Angeles attorney Kat McClain explains why she gave up on dating sites and hired a matchmaking service. That path led her back to dating apps — and to a match she might not have met otherwise.

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World's Most Influential People Gather For Davos Economic Forum

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From Switzerland, Washington Post foreign affairs writer Ishaan Tharoor talks to Rachel Martin about what entrepreneurs, politicians, artists and thinkers are talking about this year.

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Trump's ICE Deportations Are Up From Obama's Figures, Data Show

Last Updated by John Burnett on

Year-end figures analyzed by NPR show deportations to all countries — from the Middle East to Africa to Asia — have increased sharply under President Trump compared to Obama's last year in office.

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Powerful Quake Strikes Off Alaska, Triggering Tsunami Warning For Coast

The magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck about 175 southeast of Kodiak, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. U.S...

What Do Asthma, Heart Disease And Cancer Have In Common? Maybe Childhood Trauma

Toxic stress in childhood can lead to a lifetime of health problems and, ultimately, a shorter life. Here's what...

Hugh Masekela, Father Of South African Jazz, Dies At 78

He recorded more than 40 solo albums and performed with musicians ranging from Harry Belafonte to Paul Simon...

Will Work For No Benefits: The Challenges Of Being In The New Contract Workforce

A new NPR/Marist poll shows that more than half of contract workers don't get employee benefits. "We really don't...

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