NPR News

Indonesia Wakes Up And Smells Its Own Coffee — Then Drinks It

Last Updated by Anthony Kuhn on

Indonesia is the world's fourth-largest coffee producer, exporting more than it consumes. But that's changing, as demand from a rising middle class fuels entrepreneurship and connoisseurship.

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Seven Fun Facts About 'Arab Idol'

Last Updated by Daniel Estrin on

The finalists were a Palestinian, a Yemeni and a Palestinian Israeli citizen. The show highlights and erases the region's borders. The Israeli citizen was given an honorary permit to travel to Beirut.

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Hey, Students: 5 Things That Are Wrong With Your Cover Letter

Last Updated by Elissa Nadworny, Steve Drummond on

Think about what do we do at NPR: We tell stories. If your resume, your cover letter and your writing samples don't tell us a story, we're not interested.

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Here's What To Watch For When Trump Addresses Congress

Last Updated by Mara Liasson on

It's not a "State of the Union" address, but Trump's mood about the country will matter, along with whether he gives Congress direction on policy priorities like health care and taxes.

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Trump Takes His Vision To Congress, The Country And An Audience For The Ages

Last Updated by Ron Elving on

When he enters the historic chamber and re-enacts the ritual on Tuesday, he will be stepping into a dimension of real and limitless consequences — one in which he is still a celebrity apprentice.

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North Carolina Law Makes Facebook A Felony For Former Sex Offenders

Last Updated by Nina Totenberg, Lauren Russell on

North Carolina has a law banning sex offenders from social media. The state says sex offenders use sites to find future child victims. The court will decide if this is constitutional.

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'The Poky Little Puppy' And His Fellow Little Golden Books Are Turning 75

Last Updated by Lynn Neary on

Sold in supermarkets for just 25 cents, these inexpensive picture books — with cheerful illustrations and golden spines — were designed to democratize the children's book market.

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Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

Last Updated by Richard Harris on

Increasingly, advocates for patients are in the room when big medical studies are designed. They demand answers to big questions: "Will the results of this study actually help anybody?"

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For Basketball Player Quinn Cook, A Big Step Closer To The Dream

Last Updated by Tom Goldman on

It's the first regular season call up to the NBA for the 23-year-old point guard. For the past season and-a-half, he's been playing in the D-League — pro basketball's minor league.

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'People's Court' Judge Joseph Wapner Dies At 97

Last Updated by Doreen McCallister on

The People's Court was one of the biggest hits among syndicated reality TV shows. Judge Joseph Wapner was joined on the show by real-life bailiff Rusty Burrell and host Doug Llewelyn.

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A Night At Red's Juke Joint In The Mississippi Delta Is A True Blues Experience

Last Updated by Melissa Block on

A visit to a classic, hole-in-the-wall blues bar in Clarksdale, Miss., where owner Red Paden enlightens us about the blues and the Delta.

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A Shocking Ending Caps A Big Oscar Night For 'Moonlight'

Last Updated by Linda Holmes on

It wasn't a terribly exciting or unusual Academy Awards telecast — until all of a sudden, it made all kinds of history.

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How The Long-Lash Look Went From The Red Carpet To Everyday Life

Last Updated by Tanya Ballard Brown on

False eyelashes used to be mostly seen on people in movies and were hard to put on and take off. But these days, you can see that red carpet false-eyelash look on people almost anywhere.

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Minus The U.S., Asian Economic Powers Meet To Form Trade Deal

Last Updated by Bill Chappell on

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, seen as China's response to the rival TPP, has benefited from a shift in American politics.

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A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

Last Updated by Allison Aubrey on

Naltrexone was approved to treat alcohol disorders more than 20 years ago. But many doctors still don't know that when combined with counseling it can help people resist the urge to drink too much.

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Minus The U.S., Asian Economic Powers Meet To Form Trade Deal

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, seen as China's response to the rival TPP, has benefited from a...

In Response To Rising Biased Rhetoric, Muslims Run For Office

First-time candidates are seeking offices across the country. And several nonprofits are helping American Muslims...

Hey, Students: 5 Things That Are Wrong With Your Cover Letter

Think about what do we do at NPR: We tell stories. If your resume, your cover letter and your writing samples don't...

Here's What To Watch For When Trump Addresses Congress

It's not a "State of the Union" address, but Trump's mood about the country will matter, along with whether he gives...

How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

Technology has made for more ways to leak scoops to the press than ever before. And newsrooms across the country are...

A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

Naltrexone was approved to treat alcohol disorders more than 20 years ago. But many doctors still don't know that...

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