NPR News

Otto Warmbier's Parents Sue North Korea, Alleging Torture Of Their Son

Last Updated by Camila Domonoske on

Warmbier, an American college student, died last summer after spending more than a year in North Korean custody. He was returned home in a coma. A lawsuit accuses Pyongyang of killing him.

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Mass Graves Discovered 24 Years After Rwandan Genocide

Last Updated by Sasha Ingber on

Up to 3,000 bodies are thought to be buried in the graves, victims of a 100-day massacre that left 800,000 people dead. Survivors wonder why the sites are just being uncovered.

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New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

Last Updated by Debbie Elliott on

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opens Thursday in Montgomery, Ala., and includes monuments to victims of lynchings. Organizers say it's time "to confront the brutality."

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Senate Ethics Panel Admonishes Sen. Menendez

Last Updated by Susan Davis on

The bipartisan panel unanimously agreed that Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., violated Senate rules and codes of conduct in his relationship with a longtime friend who was convicted of Medicare fraud.

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Professor Who Called Barbara Bush An 'Amazing Racist' Will Keep Her Job

Last Updated by Amy Held on

It came down to freedom of speech, according to Fresno State President Joseph Castro. He noted Randa Jarrar made the remarks in a "private capacity," even as he called her conduct an embarrassment.

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Waffle House Hero, Honored By Lawmakers, Raises Thousands For Victims' Families

Last Updated by Amy Held on

James Shaw Jr., credited with saving lives after grabbing the shooter's rifle, was lauded by Tennessee lawmakers who said that "if his heroism is equaled by anything," it's his penchant for honesty.

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Finally, A Race For The Rest Of Us: 0.5K In Texas Includes Beer, Smoke Break

Last Updated by Alexis Diao on

The very short race includes unusual amenities like doughnuts and coffee. All proceeds go to charity.

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After Testifying In Cosby Trial, 1 Accuser Says 'He Had No Power Over Me'

Last Updated on

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Lise-Lotte Lublin, one of the women who accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault. Cosby was convicted Thursday on three counts of aggravated indecent assault in the case brought by Andrea Constand.

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Bill To Protect Mueller Investigation Approved By Senate Judiciary Committee

Last Updated by Kelsey Snell on

While the bill lacks support from GOP leaders in the House and Senate, it's intended to send a message to President Trump that he avoid interfering with special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Defends Himself On Capitol Hill

Last Updated on

Scott Pruitt, the embattled head of the Environmental Protection Agency, defended himself to lawmakers Thursday on Capitol Hill.

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Ford To Ditch Cars In North America, Focus On Trucks And SUVs

Last Updated by Sonari Glinton on

Its pioneered the American auto industry with the mass market Model T. Now Ford is gutting its lineup of cars in the North America, saying it will sell only two models in 2020 as it focuses on trucks and SUVs.

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Guilty Verdict In Bill Cosby Trial Effectively Ends Comedian's Career

Last Updated by Karen Grigsby Bates on

The end of Bill Cosby's trial also in effect marked the end of his career as a beloved entertainer and cultural icon. NPR looks back at Cosby's work as an entertainment pioneer, and how his growing conservatism and legal troubles have dimmed that luster for many of his admirers.

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How Glasgow Cut Crime After Once Being The 'Murder Capital Of Europe'

Last Updated by Peter Kenyon on

Once described as "murder capital of Europe", the city of Glasgow, Scotland has cut its crime rate dramatically, in part by helping offenders find a place in society.

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In Indiana, Advocates For Senior Citizens Form Army Of Guardians To Offer Care

Last Updated by Drew Daudelin on

When a senior citizen loses the ability to make medical decisions, a guardian is chosen to help them through the last years of their life. But many states offer meager financial support to their guardianship system, leaving some of the country's most vulnerable citizens without a guardian and in a perpetual limbo.

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Lawmakers Ask EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Tough Questions Amid Ethics Allegations

Last Updated by Scott Horsley on

Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt faced questions from lawmakers Thursday amid a myriad of ethics allegations and tepid support from the White House.

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New York Gov. Cuomo To Federal Immigration Officials: 'The State Will Sue'

On Wednesday, the governor sent a cease and desist letter to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, saying their...

Mass Graves Discovered 24 Years After Rwandan Genocide

Up to 3,000 bodies are thought to be buried in the graves, victims of a 100-day massacre that left 800,000 people...

Senate Ethics Panel Admonishes Sen. Menendez

The bipartisan panel unanimously agreed that Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., violated Senate rules and codes of...

After Testifying In Cosby Trial, 1 Accuser Says 'He Had No Power Over Me'

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Lise-Lotte Lublin, one of the women who accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault. Cosby was...

Fancy An American Football Match? NFL Owner Bids For London's Wembley Stadium

Shahid Khan, the American billionaire owner of the Jacksonville Jaguars, has reportedly offered nearly $835 million...

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