Factoryville, Pa. Native Serves at Subamarine Base Kings Bay | WVIA

Factoryville, Pa. Native Serves at Subamarine Base Kings Bay

Posted by Lt. Lily Hinz, Commander on

 A 2014 Lackawanna Trail High School graduate and Factoryville, Pennsylvania native is serving in the U.S. Navy at Subamarine Base Kings Bay.

 Seaman Chelsy Stugle is a master-at-arms serving at the Kings Bay-based submarine support command.

A Navy master-at-arms is responsible for operational security procedure.

“In my job I am basically a Navy police officer," said Stugle. "We deal with all sorts of violations of law on base only.”

Measuring 560 feet long, 42 feet wide and weighing more than 16,500 tons, a nuclear-powered propulsion system helps push the ship through the water at more than 20 knots.

The Navy’s ballistic missile submarines, often referred to as “boomers,” serve as an undetectable launch platform for intercontinental ballistic missiles. They are designed specifically for stealth, extended patrols and the precise delivery of missiles if directed by the President. The Ohio-class design allows the submarines to operate for 15 or more years between major overhauls. On average, the submarines spend 77 days at sea followed by 35 days in-port for maintenance.

"We demand the highest standards from our Sailors - both professionally and personally," said Rear Adm. Randy Crites, Commander, Submarine Group Ten in Kings Bay, Ga. "Seaman Stugle's chain of command, family and our great nation take immense pride in hers devotion and service to hers country. The importance of our Sailors is immeasurable; people like Chelsy Stugle are absolutely crucial to ensuring our Ships and Submarines are operating at their best - always mission ready, providing our Nation with the greatest Navy the world has ever known. I'm so very proud she is on our team."

Because of the stressful environment aboard submarines, personnel are accepted only after rigorous testing and observation. Submariners are some of the most highly trained and skilled people in the Navy. The training is highly technical and each crew has to be able to operate, maintain, and repair every system or piece of equipment on board.  Regardless of their specialty, everyone also has to learn how everything on the ship works and how to respond in emergencies to become “qualified in submarines” and earn the right to wear the coveted gold or silver dolphins on their uniform.

“I really love being a master-at-arms because I am interested in pursuing a law enforcement carreer once I get out of the Navy,” Stugle said.

Although it is difficult for most people to imagine living on a submarine, challenging submarine living conditions actually build strong fellowship among the crew. The crews are highly motivated, and quickly adapt to changing conditions.  It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Stugle and other Subamarine Base Kings Bay sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes.

“Ever since I was a little kid, being in the Navy was a dream of mine," added Stugle. "A lot of my family have served and I knew that I wanted to serve my country as well.”

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