Elizabeth Kolbert: The Prophet of Love: And Other Tales of Power and Deceit | WVIA

Elizabeth Kolbert: The Prophet of Love: And Other Tales of Power and Deceit

Posted by WVIA Admin on

Airs Friday, February 12th at 7p, Thursday, Feb. 18 at 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 21 at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 3 at 8 p.m., Sunday, March 6 at 12 p.m. and Friday, March 11 at 7 p.m. on WVIA TV

This special television presentation was recorded at Bucknell University on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 in the Weis Center for the Performing Arts. Kolbert's presentation, "The Prophet of Love: And Other Tales of Power and Deceit," will address how human activity has contributed to the sixth mass extinction in Earth's history, which she asserts is now ongoing.

Called "one of our very best science writers" by former vice president Al Gore, Kolbert received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction for The Sixth Extinction, which chronicles five previous mass species extinctions and argues that the planet is now in the midst of a sixth. "She makes an irrefutable case that what we are doing to cause a sixth mass extinction is clearly wrong," Gore wrote in a New York Times review of Kolbert's latest book. "And she makes it clear that doing what is right means accelerating our transition to a more sustainable world." In addition to winning a Pulitzer, The Sixth Extinction was named a New York Times 2014 Top Ten Best Book of the Year and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle awards for the best books of 2014.

Kolbert has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1999. Her work for that publication also garnered her the 2005 American Association for the Advancement of Science's magazine award, the 2006 National Academy of Sciences Communication Award in the newspaper/magazine category and a 2010 National Magazine Award in the reviews and criticism category. In 2010, she received the prestigious Heinz Award, which that year recognized Americans addressing global change caused by the impact of human activities and natural processes on the environment.

Established in 2002, the Janet Weis Fellow in Contemporary Letters is awarded biennially to honor and recognize individuals who represent the highest level of achievement in the craft of writing within the realms of fiction, non-fiction or biography. Previous recipients have been Robert A. Caro, Edward Albee, John Edgar Wideman, David McCullough, Derek Walcott, Joyce Carol Oates, Tom Wolfe, Salman Rushdie, John Updike, Toni Morrison and Rita Dove. The Weis Fellowship was established through a grant from the Degenstein Foundation in honor of Janet Weis, an author, civic leader and philanthropist as well as trustee emerita of the University. Her husband, Sigfried Weis, was chair of the Bucknell Board of Trustees from 1982 to 1988.

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