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See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Stingless bees don’t have stingers. So, how do they keep honey thieves away?
After cochineals die, their legacy lives on in the brilliant red hue produced by their hemolymph!
Those rows of orange cluster under a fern leaf are spores waiting to be catapulted away.
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Stingless bees don’t have stingers. So, how do they keep honey thieves away?
After cochineals die, their legacy lives on in the brilliant red hue produced by their hemolymph!
Those rows of orange cluster under a fern leaf are spores waiting to be catapulted away.
These tiny marine flatworms are smaller than a grain of rice but have amazing abilities!
Sharpshooters have super-propulsive urine using a catapult in their butt.
Corals create an underwater "snowstorm" by sending tiny white spheres up the water column.
Ever wonder how those tiny, jumpy flies got onto your bathroom wall?
Jellyfish clone themselves by morphing into a stack of squirming jellyfish pancakes.
As temperatures rise, the brown dog tick is more likely to feast on you.
This fuzzy acorn weevil uses her snout to drill through an acorn's shell.
Beekeepers and scientists are helping honeybees fight off varroa mites.
Ladybugs may be the cutest insects around, but they don't start off that way.
Do cockroaches -- daring, disgusting disease vectors -- have anything at all to offer us?
Covered in a shiny bubble, the alkali fly scuba dives in California's Mono Lake.
A “bee fly” is a freeloader that takes advantage of a bindweed turret bee’s hard work.
The scaled wormsnail cements its shell to a rock and snags its meals using mucus!
Step right up to see tiny springtails spin through the air with the greatest of ease!
Geckos navigate nearly any surface with an electron dance at the atomic scale.
The snake's forked tongue helps it smell in stereo.
Bird’s nest fungi look just like a tiny bird's nest. But those little eggs have no yolks.
How are frogs so amazing at catching bugs? It’s their supersoft tongue and special spit.
Mussels create byssal threads to attach themselves to rocks and each other.
Earthworms cozy up with a mate inside tubes of slime to make cocoons full of baby worms.
What keeps the boneless, jawless hagfish thriving after more than 300 million years? SLIME
Researchers use invisible lasers, ghastly wasps and more trickery to protect orange groves
As they gorge, oblique streaktail hoverflies help keep orange trees safe from disease.
Why is that yellowjacket crashing your BBQ? She’s gathering food for the nest’s larvae.
Explore Ophryocystis elektroscirrham and all the ways to help the Monarch butterflies.
These voracious predators cruise belly up below the surface of a pond or gentle stream.
Floating colonies of red fire ants are a risk for people wading through floodwater.
Barn owls turn mice, gophers and voles into balls of fur and bones known as pellets.
It’s called nectar robbing: Bees get nectar, but don’t pollinate the plants in exchange.
Giant water bugs pack one of the most painful bites of any insect, but they're great dads.
The spotted wing drosophila may look like a common fruit fly, but it’s so much worse.
Those precious silk garments in your closet were made by the caterpillars of a fuzzy moth.
Barnacles might look like jagged little rocks, but they have a surprisingly wild sex life.
Honeypot ants stuff members of their own colony until they look like tiny water balloons.
What animal sprays acid that reeks of vinegar from its rear end? A vinegaroon, of course.
The cage fungus looks and smells like decaying meat — on purpose.
Subterranean termites fly off in swarms, and then drop their wings to start new colonies.